Build Update, 27 April 2017: Making progress

by Jo Clarke, Marketing and Communications Officer

The History Centre construction site continues to be busy as our contractors Willmott Dixon make progress.

Demolition work and scaffolding are the two most visible things that have been happening since our last update. On some days it’s been pretty noisy working in the Museum Annexe with the sound of diggers and rubble being moved around – but it’s also confirmation that things are moving forward!

Photograph of the demolition work at the Plymouth History Centre
Work carries on as the sun starts to go down on 4 April

One of the main elements of the demolition this month has been the knocking down of the toilet block at the back of the former City Museum and Art Gallery. Weaver Demolition are the company working on this.

Demolition work takes place on the Plymouth History Centre site April 2017
The toilet block on the former City Museum and Art Gallery was demolished this month
The toilet block on the former Plymouth City Museum and Art Gallery building is demolished April 2017
A close up of the demolition in action

Great progress continues to be made with the scaffolding too. As mentioned in last month’s post this is quite an extensive piece of work. The two shots below taken three weeks apart give an indication of its ongoing advancement. LTC Scaffolding have certainly been busy!

Photograph from the History Centre web cam on 7 April 2017
A shot from the web cam on 7 April
Photograph from the History Centre web cam on 26 April 2017
A shot from the web cam on 26 April

This shot taken from the upstairs of the Caffeine Club gives you a different vantage point and a closer view of the scaffolding that’s been put up to the side and over the roof of the former Central Library.

Scaffolding going up on the History Centre construction site in Plymouth on 11 April 2017
A different view of the scaffolding taken on 11 April

Willmott Dixon also do a lot of community engagement work and the History Centre was one of the sites that they recently opened up as part of the national Open Doors initiative.

‘Open Doors’ is a chance for people who are interested in a career in the construction industry to see behind the scenes and learn more about some of the UK’s major ‘live’ construction sites. The History Centre was one of 130 sites that took part across England, Scotland and Wales – 31 of which were Willmott Dixon sites. Students from the University of Plymouth and South Devon College visited for a talk and tour.

Willmott Dixon also started a series of ‘Hard Hat Tours’ for us this month.

The first one was really successful with lots of interested people, questions and discussions. Many thanks to them and everyone who came along. The next tour takes place tomorrow and is fully booked but a new series of dates for the rest of this year have now been released, so book your places now!

Hard Hat Tour attendees at the Plymouth History Centre construction site on 31 March 2017
The attendees to our first-ever Hard Hat Tour

I’ll wrap up this post with the most recent footage we have from the web cam – just in case you haven’t already seen it on our YouTube channel. This contains all the footage from March – just look at how many different types of weather all those working on site had to contend with!

History Centre Heroes: Ellen MacArthur DBE

by Rosemary Babichev

It was ‘Swallows and Amazons’ the classic children’s story of sailing and adventure on the Norfolk Broads that led Ellen MacArthur to choose the tack that made her a record breaking yachtswoman. She first hit the headlines sailing solo round the world aged only 24, little more than a decade after saving up for her first boat, the ‘Threp’ny Bit’ with money from missing dinners at school in Derbyshire where she grew up.

Photographic portrait of female sailor Ellen MacArthur

Her connection with Plymouth came in 2000 when left the port to race to Rhode Island in the USA in just 14 days, 23 hours and 11 minutes, setting the record for a woman making a solo passage East-West across the Atlantic. She has continued to champion the city as the starting point for the Transat, the first solo yacht race in history which has started from Plymouth ever since it began in 1960.

Her most incredible feat is circumnavigating the globe entirely alone in her high-speed trimaran in 2005. She had to face heaving seas fleeing from an 80 mile-an-hour storm in the Southern Ocean, knowing she was at any time four days away from being rescued – the nearest humans were on the international space station somewhere above. She successfully took the record from Frenchman Francis Joyon, and though he took it back three years later, she is still the fastest woman to sail round the world solo to this date.

On a vessel leaping across mountainous waves, racing the clock she knew her life depended making the right decisions in her battle with the weather, but that she had total control over everything that happened on the ship. MacArthur learnt above all the importance of planning. Each last item she needed during the voyage had to be brought from the outset, if something got used up she would have do make do without.

Photography of Ellen MacArthur celebrating after breaking the round the world sailing record

After this, shocked by abandoned whaling stations on a desolate island in the South Atlantic while on a survey of Albatross she began to see her experiences on a boat at sea as a metaphor for our world in the universe. Like the food and materials she used as she sailed along, she felt the critical importance of doing something to stop coal, oil and gas being burnt up to no advantage to the planet.

Since 2008, instead of using her immense determination to plan ever faster solo crossings, MacArthur seeks out international decision makers and people of influence in universities and governments to explore ways of developing a ‘circular economy’. Waste would be eliminated altogether. Every product would be designed to have a complete ‘life cycle’ – each component when obsolete or used up could be used in other products or services and have new functions in supporting human life.

She now runs the Ellen MacArthur Foundation that funds research into plastics and textiles, beer making from waste bread, and urban biocycles. It supports an online community to ensure the ideas behind changing from a one way, linear economy to a circular one are discussed continuously.

Photograph of an Ellen MacArthur Cancer Trust sailing yacht

Her lifelong love of the excitement and freedom of sailing she shares with children suffering life-threatening illness through the Ellen MacArthur cancer trust. MacArthur has now put her courage and commitment to survival in the service of other people.

Museum on Tour, 13 April 2017: Ropewalks #5 – Bringing heritage and performing arts together

by Victoria Lester, City Explainer

Once upon a time I was an historian, a published historian in fact who became a language assistant who then came back to the UK – back to Plymouth to become unemployed for two years!

But that was once upon a time.

I decided to do something I’d always wanted to do which was work in the performing arts. It hasn’t been easy. Starting down a new career path in my mid-twenties when my confidence was in the dustbin wasn’t something I ever thought I would have to do. Starting a career in an industry where your confidence can sometimes take a beating hasn’t necessarily made it easier – but it has made me more determined.

I enrolled in a BTEC in Performing Arts at City College to test my resolve and now here I am. It’s nearly four years since I decided to go down this route and without the help and support I’ve received from the Barbican Theatre I wouldn’t be here today.

Where’s here? I’m one of the devising actors on the ‘Ropewalks’ walking tours project, working with the Barbican Theatre and staff from the City Council’s Arts and Heritage Service/History Centre to help bring heritage and performing arts together.

A photograph of the Ropewalks team in a devising session at the Barbican Theatre, Plymouth

It’s been a fascinating experience, working with a large team of actors, directors, writers, costume designers, graphic designers, marketing officers, historical professionals and more to bring a series of theatrical walking tours that will bring the Barbican to life to the people of Plymouth.

I thought I knew the history of Plymouth. I’ve learnt that you can never really know the full history of a place or of a people. You can only know so much and there’s always something new to discover.

The 'Ropewalks' team taking part in a filming session at the Mayflower Museum, Plymouth

Over the last few months, as part of the research and development process we’ve visited the South West Film and Television Archive and the Devonport Naval Heritage Centre – a place I’d only ever heard of. Going there and hearing about the social history of Plymouth alongside the military was fascinating. We heard about:

  • the widows of the ropewalk: ladies whose husbands had been killed in the line of duty
  • The ever present rivalry between Plymouth and Portsmouth
  • the ladies who lived on board ship, and just why someone could be called ‘son of a gun’
  • how during the First World War the telegrams from sailors would often come long before official word of a battle having been fought

……….and so much more.

Back in the theatre we’ve been taking extracts from texts, history books and original sources, and considering potential scenarios, characters and pieces that scriptwriter Jon Nash has written. We adapted them and ‘threw them around’ to see what would stick. One thing we realised very early on was that an historical fact or object without a glimpse of the person behind it wasn’t engaging. Put a person behind it though and suddenly it was brought to life.

Victoria Lester in a devising session for the 'Ropewalks' project at the Barbican Theatre

Among the many things I’ll never forget us doing are:

  • six of us being on stage and throwing the history of the Barbican around the room, starting in the prehistoric we bounced the story between us all the way to the present day
  • Re-enacting aspects of the Bread Riots – a part of history I’d never heard of! Who doesn’t love a good riot?
  • Finding the often contrary voices and characters of the ladies of Plymouth and realising how you actually go about gutting a fish

It’s been a long journey with many a wander through the streets of the Barbican marvelling at the rich and colourful history of this city that deserves to be remembered.

Members of the 'Ropewalks' team in discussion at the Mayflower Museum, Plymouth

Plymouth is a city that we should be proud of and I am very proud to have been part of the team involved in a project which is combining so many strands to develop a lively new form of theatre that I firmly believe will create an immersive experience for everyone who comes to watch.

Museum on Tour, 12 April 2017: Thinking Tantra

by Rachael Aylmore, Plymouth University Fine Art student and Peninsula Arts Exhibition Intern

As part of the journey towards the History Centre, Peninsula Arts and staff from the Arts and Heritage Service are working together on a series of partnership exhibitions.

During my placement at Peninsula Arts I have been fortunate enough to support the installation of their current exhibition, ‘Thinking Tantra’ – ‘Tan’ being Sanskrit for stretch and ‘tra’ Sanskrit for beyond boundaries. These beautiful, bold and abstract Tantra pieces of art have been created as tools for meditation and rituals linked to Sanskrit texts.

The exhibition unfolds
Together with Polly Irish and Catrine Wallace (also Fine Art students and Peninsula Arts Interns), I have gained an understanding of the many different processes and tasks that are involved with setting up an exhibition – from prepping the space, collecting the work, curating and even publicity. Throughout the last two weeks in March before ‘Thinking Tantra’ opened, we watched it unfold in front of us and learnt all the important steps and skills (as well as people) it takes for an exhibition to come together smoothly and successfully.

Before we even get a glimpse of artwork, the Peninsula Arts Gallery must be prepped, walls taken down (or moved) and walls painted for each show. It’s important that that the gallery is in good condition for the artwork to be displayed. There are many helping hands involved in this process including technicians, gallery assistants and curators. Stripping the gallery back to its bones and starting from fresh allows the curator to view the space with new eyes and make the final decisions about the placement of works.

It’s like Christmas
Once the space is prepped and ready to go, the exciting process of removing the carefully packaged artwork from storage can begin – it’s like Christmas in March! We can then begin the all-important quality and condition check of every single piece of art.

Once the checks have been completed, one of the final parts of setting up an exhibition is of course installing the work. Although rather daunting and nerve racking the process is relatively straightforward and can be done fairly quickly once a system has been established. A lot of measuring, maths and wrongly drawn pencil marks later, the exhibition space finally starts to come alive!

Photograph of the Thinking Tantra exhibition install at Peninsula Arts in 2017

Thinking Tantra
With the exhibition installed and displayed in its full glory, you can really get a feel for the use of colours, shapes and rituals as well as the transcendental ideas behind the Tantra artwork.

Photograph of the Thinking Tantra exhibition at Peninsula Arts in 2017

I hope you’ll visit the exhibition while it’s here in the city. We are the only UK venue on the tour outside London and it will be on display until 27 May.


‘Thinking Tantra’ is a collaboration between Rebecca Heald, Drawing Room, London and Amrita Jhaveri Contemporary, Mumbai.

‘Thinking Tantra’ is a History Centre partnership exhibition.

Decant Day, 5 April 2017: A New Scanner for SWFTA

by Jo Clarke, Marketing and Communications Officer
with thanks to James Gibbs at SWFTA for his great and informative Facebook posts!

This week a piece of equipment arrived at the South West Film and Television Archive (SWFTA) that has been long-awaited – a brand new scanner. On the surface of it, this might not seem like major news, but it will make a really big difference to the work that takes place at SWFTA and will also have an important legacy for the History Centre.

SWFTA has been using a Rank Cintel MKIII scanner for some time. In fact, it’s provided around 30 years of faithful service to the archive and, prior to that, BBC Bristol. Even last week it was busy being put through its paces as all of these were run through it for various projects, including the ongoing development of the gallery designs for the History Centre.

Part of the collections at the South West Film and Television Archive, Plymouth.
The Rank Cintel MKIII has certainly been kept busy recently!

Although this scanner will now go into ‘semi-retirement’, SWFTA will continue to use it and it will eventually go on public display in one of the galleries at the History Centre.

SWFTA had a bit of preparation to do in the early part of March before they could take delivery of their new addition…..

Photograph of SWFTA's old scanner being moved in preparation for the delivery of a new one.
Making way for the new delivery…..

When the scanner arrived on 27 March all the way from Italy, it turned up in a 350kg crate! A team of 6 from Kirtley Removals made sure it was safely delivered to Plymouth. They previously worked with the History Centre when the City Museum and Art Gallery was being decanted last year and made the heavy lifting look easy…..

Delivery of a new scanner at the South West Film and Television Archive, Plymouth

The Kirtley Removals team did a great job of looking after the scanner on the last leg of its journey

The new scanner is a CIR D-Archiver, described in the industry as a ‘complete tool for the restoration and archival process’ and ‘an all-in-one solution for film archival’.

It’s different to the Rank Cintel MKIII because it scans every single frame of film as a separate image file.

The D-Archiver can scan in and export a variety of different file types. SWFTA will most likely be scanning RAW files and then exporting them as Digital Picture Exchange or DPX files.

DPX is usually the chosen format for still frames in storage worldwide. The files will be big which presents us with storage challenges, but the major positive is that they will be the best quality copies possible. This is great news for the History Centre. The better preserved the SWFTA collection is, the greater the potential for using it to enhance our visitor experience and providing the public with access to it.

SWFTA staff and volunteers had their first day of training on the scanner this week. The day involved a bit of unpacking, a bit of assembly and a bit of scanning. All in all it was a good and productive day at the archive – as you can see from the slideshow below.

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As this post hopefully outlines, the delivery of the new scanner marks the start of an exciting time for the staff, volunteers and film collection at SWFTA. For a further reminder about the archive and its role in the History Centre partnership take a look at the ‘Meet the Team’ feature we produced last year.

Build Update, 30 March 2017: A hive of activity

by Jo Clarke, Marketing and Communications Officer

If you’ve been checking out our web cam on a regular basis you’ll have realised that things have been really busy on site since our last #BuildUpdate post four weeks ago. A quick glance at these two shots taken a couple of weeks apart gives you an idea of the increase in activity.

A web cam shot taken on 13 March 2017 of the Plymouth History Centre construction site
A web cam shot taken on 13 March 2017
A web cam shot taken on 30 March 2017 of the Plymouth History Centre construction site
A web cam shot taken on 30 March 2017

Five key things have happened since our last report.

The first is the removal of some Japanese Knotweed from a patch of land on the site.  This invasive plant was introduced to the UK in the late 1800s and can create a whole range of problems.

The second is what is know as a ‘soft strip’ in the former Central Library. A ‘soft strip’ involves the removal of internal fixtures and fittings, ultimately leaving a ‘frame’ ready for building and construction work. Carpet tiles have been taken up, windows, doors and door frames have been removed. You can get a good idea of the work that’s been undertaken from this image, which shows a part of the Library which is scheduled for demolition.

A photograph of part of Plymouth's Central Library ready for demolitition
This part of the former Central Library building has been prepped ready for demolition. Image taken by Penny Cross, Plymouth Herald

The third is the appearance of another set of hoardings – this time at the back of Chapel Lane – shown here on a lovely sunny day slightly earlier in the month.

Hoardings on Chapel Lane, Plymouth as part of the History Centre construction site
New hoardings at the back of the History Centre site

The fourth is the demolition of some small outbuildings in the car park next to St Luke’s Church. This work largely took place during the weeks of 6 March and 13 March. The demolition will enable us to create a walkway from Chapel Street through to Tavistock Place, providing easy access to the History Centre complex and the public piazza.

Demolition work begins at the Plymouth History Centre site - 10 March 2017
Demolition work begins. This shot was taken on 10 March 2017 from Chapel Lane
Demolition work at the Plymouth History Centre site - 28 March 2017
The demolition of one of the St Luke’s Church outbuildings complete. This shot was taken on 28 March 2017 from Tavistock Place

The fifth and probably most publicly visible piece of work is the scaffolding. This started to go up on 20 March and, due to its extent, will take around five weeks to install.

Scaffolding on the former Plymouth Central Library building - March 2017
Scaffolding has started to go up on the former Central Library building

A temporary roof has also been put up over the former Central Library building. The existing roof will be taken off and a new one put on. This work will take place under the temporary roof meaning the rest of the building will be kept dry.

The temporary roof on the former Plymouth Central Library building - March 2017
A new roof will be created under the temporary one now in place over the former Central Library building. Image taken by Penny Cross, Plymouth Herald

We’ll be back with another #BuildUpdate in late April when there will no doubt be lots more work to report on. We’ll finish with our latest progress report video which gives you an overview of a number of things that have been achieved for the History Centre from January to March 2017.

Museum On Tour, 23 March 2017: Ropewalks #4 – Creating an immersive experience

by Toluse Farley, City Explainer

7 years ago I was hospitalised. Although this sounds like a dramatic way to begin my post it’s important as it was a life event that would end up being the catalyst for my recent career path and my involvement in this project!

To help aid my recovery I decided to enroll in a course at City College. I was looking for something that would challenge me.

I went to an Open Day at the Goschen Centre and left later that day having signed up for a BTEC in Performing Arts. I knew it wouldn’t be easy but was determined to apply myself.

Through the course I was introduced to the Barbican Theatre. The experience has been invaluable. Without it I could not have progressed to the point I’m at now or developed the confidence to ‘put myself out there’!

Toluse Farley from Plymouth City Museum and Art Gallery's City Explainers Team

Mark Laville from the Barbican Theatre gave a presentation to our entire year. He explained what they were about as a company and how they work to empower young performers to express themselves through the arts in a safe accessible environment. Moved by his passion and integrity I approached him about how I could get involved.

Some 14 months later here I am working on a project with the Barbican Theatre and the Arts and Heritage Service to help bring the stories of the Barbican to life through a series of theatrical walking tours.

I am one of the devising actors on the project and have thoroughly enjoyed the process. It’s given me a chance to work as part of a large team with fellow actors, directors, costume designers, graphic designers, historical professionals and more.

Learning about the history of Plymouth and the Barbican area has been really inspiring for devising the theatrical aspect of the tours.

A figurehead at the Devonport Naval Heritage Centre in Plymouth

One of the things we’ve done as part of our research and development process is to visit the Devonport Naval Heritage Centre where I learned many facts that I was previously unaware of.

Many of the things we heard about have had an impact not only locally but also worldwide, such as:

  • How a Plymouth-based engineer named Dummer was commissioned to build the Dock in Devon in 1691. It was the first stone clad dry dock to be built and has since been copied worldwide.
  • How Aggie Weston set up a sailor’s rest home on Fore Street, Devonport among the theatres, shops and department stores. It provided sailors coming off their ships an alternative to the pub and brothels and had facilities like restaurants, cafes, billiard rooms and cabins.
  • HMS Plymouth, a Frigate (warship) that served in the Falklands.
  • How Plymouth, Devonport and Stonehouse was amalgamated from three towns into one in 1914 as a result of the First World War
  • How the West Country has produced some of the greatest sailors we’ve known who have developed colonies, circumnavigated the globe, defeated the Spanish in the Armada and more.

A model of a warship at the Devonport Naval Heritage Centre in Plymouth

These are just the tip of the iceberg. What the visit confirmed for me is what a rich cultural heritage there is here in Plymouth. It deserves to be remembered and celebrated. I hope this project will help bring more awareness of this.

Since our visit to the Naval Heritage Centre we have spent many hours mulling over our research. It’s helped us to conjure up scenarios and characters drawn from the history of the area. Combined with the landmarks around the waterfront and the events we’ve learned of it’s a fantastic recipe for creating an immersive and entertaining experience.

Members of Plymouth City Museum and Art Gallery's City Explainers team on a research visit to the Devonport Naval Heritage Centre

I’m proud to be a part of a team that is developing this innovative form of theatre – and hope you’re all looking forward to something which commemorates Plymouth, from its humble beginnings through to its monumental achievements.