More objects online!

By Fiona Booth, Collections Information Officer

Whet your appetite for social history collections online!

One of the outcomes of the Stories from the Stores project is to improve the documention of the social history collection. Volunteers have been busy helping us to photograph the objects as they are cleaned and repacked in the gallery.   These are all added to our database, and published once the record is ready.

 15 records were added initially, but with thanks to the efforts of staff and volunteers working on the project to date, you can now view the second batch of our collection online. There are almost 400 items online to date – a couple examples are below!

Box for film with a ‘Plymouth Drug Company’ label
Box – Pophams of Plymouth

The catalogue will be growing as we continue to document the collection, but it will give you an idea of what’s in the collection.

If you are in town tomorrow (Saturday 29th June, 10am-4pm) then do pop in to our Share a Story day at the museum. We would love to hear your stories about the things you see in the exhibition!

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2 thoughts on “More objects online!”

  1. I recently purchased a small dresser with adjustable mirror atop. On the back theres a plaque that says Pophams Plymouth. Any idea when this was made or who made it. Value??

    1. Hi Jason, I’m afraid we don’t provide valuations so you would be best contacting a commercial valuer. Our curator has passed on some information about Pophams which she hopes might be useful:

      Messrs Popham, Radford and Company was originally set up in 1844 as a drapers and furnishings retailer. The company’s city centre premises in Bedford Street were destroyed during the Blitz (1941). The new store opened in 1958 in Royal Parade. However, their post-war success was relatively short-lived. Times were changing and as a luxury department store they could not survive the economic depression of the early 1970s. The store closed in 1974. Popham’s was seen as a high-end department store. They sold designer goods and prided themselves on being ‘the store of friendly service’.

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