Build Update, 19 July 2017: Onwards and upwards

by Jo Clarke, Marketing and Communications Officer

We’re mid-way through July already and there’s plenty more progress on site.

Watch the web cam footage from last month for an overview of what happened in June.

The mechanical demolition work that started in the middle of June continues. Here are some quick shots that show you how progress is being made.

Photograph of demolition work at the Plymouth History Centre - June 2017

The work to remove the non-Listed portion of the former Central Library is crucial to the development of the History Centre. Once it’s gone it will create the space needed to construct what we affectionately refer to as our ‘box in the sky’.

Photograph of demolition work at the Plymouth History Centre site on 3 July 2017

This is the extension where the collections from the South West Image Bank, South West Film and Television Archive and Plymouth and West Devon Record Office will be stored.

At the moment all three archives are in need of a new home and are being stored in locations around the city that are no longer fit for purpose. The archives are extremely important and require specialist environmental conditions to ensure that what’s contained within is preserved to as high a standard as possible. Creating the new extension will enable us to achieve these things – plus it will look great and will provide a wonderful focal point for the History Centre as a whole, completely transforming Tavistock Place.

Visual of the Plymouth History Centre extension

Those of you who walk or drive up and down North Hill will have noticed how the scaffolding scheme is nearly covering the entire Museum and Art Gallery building now. Here’s an image from about 10 days ago showing how far the scaffolders have progressed.

Scaffolding on the former Museum and Art Gallery in Plymouth, 3 July 2017

I’ll close this post with a link to our April to June 2017 Progress Report video – a testament to just how much has been achieved in the last three months, both on site and elsewhere.

Museum On Tour, 5 July 2017: Summer’s here and autumn’s in the planning

by Jo Clarke, Marketing and Communications Officer

Our Beryl: Beryl Cook at Home
Our new Beryl Cook exhibition has been open for just over a week and we’re thrilled with how it looks. As I mentioned in last month’s #MuseumOnTour post, we’ve co-curated it with her family which has given us access to some of her earliest and quirkiest works.

The exhibition will be on display until the end of 9 September and is free to view at the Council House. We’ve got lots of events taking place over the summer which take their inspiration from the exhibition which we hope you’ll enjoy if you come along.

Advert for the Beryl Cook exhibition at Plymouth's Council House June 2017

The Cook family has produced a range of merchandise which we’re also selling in the exhibition. Lisa Coombes, one of my colleagues who works in our Business Support team, has overseen the creation of a retail area which looks great.

This is the third exhibition we’ve hosted at the Council House this year. It’s great to have a space where we can continue to run a temporary exhibition programme even though our main building is closed.

Turning part of what has always been a private building into a public space is not without its challenges – especially when the building doesn’t belong to you and is used for a variety of functions. We have been working with a number of our City Council colleagues behind the scenes to ensure everything runs as smoothly as it possibly can. We’ve also installed some extra signage on and around the Council House for members of the public who still aren’t sure where it’s located – it’s the building to the left of the Civic Centre.

Photograph of the front of the Council House Plymouth

Poppies: WAVE
Now our summer programme is well and truly underway we’re finalising our autumn/winter activities as well as planning ahead for 2018.

During the latter months of 2017 our two biggest projects are both partnership initiatives. We are thrilled to be working with the Commonwealth War Graves Commission (CWGC) who are bringing ‘Poppies: WAVE’ to the city from 23 August to 19 November. You may have already seen quite a lot of information about it in the local press and online. It will be installed on the large war memorial on the Hoe.

The iconic sculpture presented by 14-18 NOW is a sweeping arch of bright red poppy heads suspended on towering stalks. It’s one of two sculptures, by artist Paul Cummins and designer Tom Piper, initially conceived as the key dramatic sculptural elements in the installation ‘Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red’. Millions of people saw it at the Tower of London in 2014, marking the centenary of the outbreak of the First World War. You can find out more about it here.

Photograph of Poppies: WAVE in Southend 2017
‘Poppies: WAVE’ has recently been installed at Barge Pier, Shoeburyness, Southend-on- Sea as part of its UK-wide tour organised by 14-18 NOW. (Photo by Ian Gavan/Getty Images for 14-18 NOW).

We have been working with the CWGC over the last few months to help devise an events and engagement programme that will take place while ‘Poppies: WAVE’ is in Plymouth. Full details will be announced very soon!

In the meantime, you can watch an official video clip produced by 14-18 NOW by clicking on this image.

Photo of poppies

We The People Are The Work
Our other main autumn/winter partnership project is ‘We The People Are The Work’ and sees us collaborating with Peninsula Arts, Plymouth College of Art, Plymouth Arts Centre and KARST on a multi-site exhibition which will be on display from 22 September to 18 November.

‘We The People Are The Work’ has been curated by Simon Morrissey. It will feature a series of new artworks by five international artists that explore our engagement with politics and identity. Take a look at the website for more information about the project and the artists. We’ll be revealing more in the coming weeks!

Behind the Scenes, 28 June 2017: New members of the team

by Jo Clarke, Marketing and Communications Officer

Largely thanks to the Heritage Lottery Fund support the History Centre project is receiving, we have recently welcomed some new members of staff.

The roles they’ll be carrying out are quite varied and they all bring a range of skills and experience to the team. We thought you’d like to meet them and find out a little more about them.

Photograph of new Plymouth History Centre staff - June 2017
Back row from L-R: Lizzie Edwards, Stacey Turner and Nicoletta Lambertucci. Front row L-R: Rebecca Wickes, Stacey Anderson and Terah Walkup.

Lizzie Edwards: Lizzie has moved to Devon from London to join us as a Learning Development Officer (Schools). She previously worked at the British Museum as the Education Manager for the Samsung Digital Discovery Centre, where she managed a learning programme for schools and families using advanced digital technologies to engage these audiences with the Museum’s collection. Notable projects included creating a virtual reality Bronze Age experience – referenced in the DCMS’ Culture White Paper as an example of how technology can expand engagement with heritage – and developing a programme of ‘Virtual Visits’ for schools outside of London. Prior to working at the British Museum, Lizzie also worked at the National Maritime Museum, Museum of London and the Building Exploratory.

Stacey Turner: Stacey has really had to hit the ground running since she joined us a few weeks ago as our new Events and Audience Development Coordinator. She’s already helped finalise our fantastic Beryl Cook-themed summer event programme, plan our autumn/winter programme, organised two exhibition launches and worked at Local Studies Day, the Freedom Community Festival and the Contemporary Craft Festival. Stacey joins us with experience of developing and managing events at the National Marine Aquarium as well as a university in Australia.

Nicoletta Lambertucci: Nicoletta is a curator based in London and holds an MA in Philosophy and Art Theory from Goldsmiths College. She will be working with us as our Contemporary Art Curator, looking at how we can embed contemporary visual art and new commissions throughout the History Centre. Since 2011 she has worked at DRAF (David Roberts Art Foundation) – an independent contemporary art space in London. In 2016 she curated Tarantallegra at Hester, NYC and Mundus Muliebris at BASEMENT ROMA, Rome. In 2018 she will present a two-artist project at Meter, Copenhagen in collaboration with the University of Copenhagen. She is also a contributor for Cura Magazine.

Rebecca Wickes: Rebecca joined us in mid-April as our new Volunteer and Early Career Development Officer. This is a post we have never had before so we are very excited about the potential it has to enhance our service. Rebecca will be working with staff from all areas of the History Centre to develop our volunteer offer and to help recruit the volunteers we need. She has come to us from the National Trust where she previously coordinated over 300 volunteers. She also possesses substantial experience in commercial and marketing activities within a heritage setting.

Stacey Anderson: Our new Media Archivist has worked in a number of heritage organisations in the region including the Plymouth and West Devon Record Office, Cornwall Record Office and the Courtney Library at the Royal Cornwall Museum. She was the founding Archivist for the South West Image Bank and, most recently, the Executive Archive Director for the South West Film and Television Archive. Stacey is a Registered Member of the Archives and Records Association (ARA), an active Committee Member of the Film Sound and Photography Section of the ARA and a member of the Association of Moving Image Archivists (AMIA). A passionate advocate for our region’s film and photographic heritage, Stacey leads the gallery team working on the History Centre’s ‘Media Lab’. She will also be helping to shape our digital preservation strategy which will ensure the long-term management of our media collections.

Terah Walkup: Our new Fine Art Curator (maternity cover) has previously worked as a research associate at the Art Institute of Chicago where she coordinated exhibitions and assisted with the re-installation and re-design of the museum’s ancient art collection. In Chicago, she also ran public museum programmes and gave popular lectures on the history of art. Terah brings a keen interest in the eighteenth century to her role so is really excited to be working with the History Centre’s wealth of paintings, prints and drawings. Since moving to the South West over a year ago, she has volunteered at cultural institutions in the area, including Exeter Cathedral and the RAMM, as well as learning the proper way to put jam and cream on a scone!

Build Update, 21 June 2017: Major milestones

by Jo Clarke, Marketing and Communications Officer

We’ve got some major pieces of news to round up in this month’s #BuildUpdate!

It’s hard to believe we’re more than half way through June already. In case you haven’t seen it yet, here’s the most recent time lapse video from the construction site web cam. This covers everything that happened during May – you can really see the scaffolding starting to take shape.

Speaking of scaffolding, here are a couple of images taken from the North Hill side of the site. Hopefully these give you a really good idea of the extent of the scheme.

The scaffolding at the Plymouth History Centre, June 2017
In this image you can see how the scheme has now moved on to cover the former City Museum and Art Gallery building as well.

The scaffolding at the Plymouth History Centre, June 2017

In another exciting development, demolition of the post-war extension to the rear of the former Central Library began on Tuesday 13 June.

We’ve had lots of comments from people who are concerned that we are demolishing the Museum and Library buildings in their entirety – but fear not! We are only removing the non-Listed section at the back of the Library plus a few small outbuildings. Aside from this we will be retaining and using as much of the beautiful Edwardian buildings as possible.

Here’s a short video featuring representatives from our construction company Willmott Dixon outlining what’s happening. As Steve Killer, Assistant Site Manager explains: “We’re starting the mechanical demolition as we refer to it and will be demolishing the portion of the building that was added on after the damage caused by the (Second World) War. We’ve been through a process of separating the parts of the building that will be staying and the bit that needs to go – we call this our demolition cut-line.”

The other major news this month is that we have signed a massive £22.6 million contract with Willmott Dixon for all our major construction work. The signing of the contract marks a new phase for the History Centre project and has involved a huge number of people and a great deal of hard work. 

Major construction work will begin this summer with a projected completion date of late summer 2019. The work will include the creation of a brand new extension which will house the archive collections from the Plymouth and West Devon Record Office, South West Image Bank and South West Film and Television Archive.

Here’s Councillor Ian Bowyer, Leader, Plymouth City Council (left) and John Boughton, Deputy Managing Director, Willmott Dixon (right) signing the contract.

200617-Museum-Contract-Signing_001-1024x680

You can read the full news story here if you’d like to find out more. I’ll have another #BuildUpdate for you in late July.

 

Museum On Tour, 8 June 2017: Ropewalks #8 – Getting our message across

by Sheila Snellgrove, Project Producer and Sara Norrish, Project Director

How do you turn 70 pages of extraordinary writing into a walking tour with a difference? Well, I think we’ve just done it with ‘Ropewalks’.

Our theatrical walking tour takes a look at the underbelly of our city and the lesser-known tales of some of its inhabitants. History is written by the victors we know, but this tale scripted by writer Jon Nash takes some of the invisible people and puts them front and centre.

Ropewalks performance on Plymouth's Barbican June 2017 From fisherwoman and abolitionists to the starving inside our walls during the civil war, ‘Ropewalks’ traces the steps of the untraceable and celebrates their extraordinary stories. We hope it also charges audiences with excitement and enquiry about our hidden city. The Blitz may have decimated our physical spaces but this walk offers you a glimpse into the beating heart of those who call themselves Plymothians, past and present.

We’ve been overwhelmed by the tremendous audience response so far. ‘Ropewalks’ started on 20 May and to date we’ve had 14 performances – all of which have been brilliantly received and more or less sold out.

The three characters who lead people around the waterfront are all women. In days gone by the females of our city had to be tough while they were left to hold the fort by the men who went to sea; battling, fishing, trading or exploring the world. When Count Magalotti visited Plymouth in 1669 he remarked that he could only see women and boys!

All our audiences so far have told us how much they’ve enjoyed the experience and they’d love to see more like this in Plymouth – what a wonderful start to a pilot project! Looking specifically at the words they’ve used to describe the performance is really interesting. ‘History’, ‘Fun’ and ‘Very’ (as in very interesting, very good, very funny) appear in half the responses, so we’re clearly getting our message across. We wanted to tell history in a new and very exciting way and it seems people agree we’ve achieved that.

Some of my favourite comments have been: “Fantastic, funny, enjoyable and informative”; “Very professional, very funny, very PLYMOUTH! Well done and thank you”; “Very informative and entertaining, smiled the whole way around” and “So different and very entertaining”. I was thrilled that my elderly neighbour hobbled her way around and loved it as much as one of my friend’s little six year old and 13-year old – that proves to me that the performances have something for everyone.

‘Ropewalks’ is now taking a short break and will begin again in time for the summer holidays on 6 August when we’ll deliver another 16 performances on Wednesdays and Sundays. Two of these have already sold out so if you want to come along don’t leave it too late to book your tickets!

Visit our ‘Ropewalks’ project page for more background information and links.

Museum On Tour, 1 June 2017: Ropewalks #7 – Creating the Costumes

by Hannah McArthur, Costume Designer and Maker

I’m a recent graduate from Plymouth College of Art where I studied Costume Production and Associated Crafts. I’m ready to set out on my career as a freelance costume designer/maker and the ‘Ropewalks’ project has enabled me to take the first step on this path as well as work locally.

I have a passion for creating elaborate costumes that capture the imagination of others. ‘Ropewalks’ was the perfect opportunity for me to go all out with my elaborate designs!

I wanted to harness the colours and atmosphere of the Barbican so have used the rich shades you often see on the fishing boats in the harbour as well as inspiration from our local maritime heritage. My design process began with a range of mood boards that I put together, filled with images of the history of the Barbican, the boats and their colourful nets.

DSC_0326

Whilst creating these costumes, I met Mariana from ‘The Ocean Corner’. Mariana collects ocean debris for creative workshops and transforms vintage fashion into beautiful works of art. This was the inspiration for the headpieces I made to accompany the costumes.

I wanted to create a visual spectacle with the three Barbican women who are the main characters in ‘Ropewalks’. They are meant to be timeless and have so many stories to share. I wanted to create an image of three women who think they are invisible, when in fact they are quite the opposite with their colours, shapes, tales and all round kookiness!

I was around for the first weekend of performances in late May and was able to observe the reactions that the general public had as these three women and their audiences went walking down the Barbican’s cobbled streets. People were intrigued. What’s going on? What on earth are they wearing? That’s exactly the reaction I was hoping for!

I feel honoured to be a part of this new and exciting project. It has boosted my confidence and I have thoroughly enjoyed working with established professionals. I hope that the tours capture peoples’ imagination and help them learn new things about the Barbican in a fun and memorable way.

See more images of Hannah’s brilliant costumes on our photostream.

Build Update: 24 May 2017, Discoveries and Hoardings

by Jo Clarke, Marketing and Communications Officer

Welcome to this month’s update on all things to do with the building and construction work that’s taking place at the History Centre site.

Firstly, here’s the latest time lapse video from the web cam which takes us back to everything that happened during April.

You may have seen the report in the Herald but work at St Luke’s Church has unearthed some old gravestones. Our building contractors already knew they were underneath the old timber floor and that there were no bodies to be found! The gravestones were revealed when the floor boards inside the church were ripped up. An archaeologist was present at the time to make sure all the relevant information about them was recorded.

Picture by Paul Slater/PSI – http://paulslaterimages.newsprints.co.uk

St Luke’s Church stopped functioning as a place of worship in 1964 and the floor was rebuilt – hence the reason why there was no need to expect any hidden surprises! In these two images courtesy of the Herald you can get a good idea of how St Luke’s Church currently looks now the floor boards and the false ceiling have been removed.

Picture by Paul Slater/PSI – http://paulslaterimages.newsprints.co.uk
Picture by Paul Slater/PSI – http://paulslaterimages.newsprints.co.uk

Elsewhere on site, progress continues to be made with the scaffolding. This is most visible from the North Hill/Drake Circus side of the former Central Library building where you can really see the extent of the scheme.

Scaffolding being put up over the former Central Library in Plymouth

The other most visible change is that the graphics have at last been installed on our hoardings! As well as acknowledging our partners and funders, and highlighting the ‘Museum On Tour’ programme we’re currently running in a range of offsite locations, the graphics feature large-scale black and white images of scenes and people from Plymouth. The images we’ve used are from the collections at the Plymouth and West Devon Record Office and South West Image Bank.

The graphics were expertly installed over a period of four days by Atlas Graphics – not bad going considering they had to apply multiple sections of vinyl over an area of more than 150 metres in length by 5 metres high. I hope you’ll agree that now they’re up they look really smart.

I’ll be back again in June with more updates. In the meantime, make sure you keep an eye on the blog for collections, History Centre Heroes and ‘Museum On Tour’ updates too.